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Project Module 1: Internship


Internship (extern, third semester, winter semester, in the time between October and February - 9 weeks) (15 credits)

The students should complete their internship (9 weeks) in a film production company, TV-station, museum or other related field of the Master programme. This internship shall give students an insight into potential areas of employment and confront them with the professional demands in one of the related fields.

Please note that it is possible for advanced students to obtain an exemption from doing the internship. This should be discussed on an individual-case basis with the coordinator of the program. Students will instead have to write a replacement paper. 

For those doing the internship, you should ask your internship provider for an official letter certifying that you did your internship there. The letter should include: Name and contact of internship institution/provider, internship dates and a  brief description of tasks.

You should ideally finish your internship during the third semester (before March). If this is not possible, the absolute deadline is June 30th.

Internship Guidelines

Professional Perspectives in Visual and Media Anthropology (Prof. Dr. Undine Frömming)

Online-course

In this course students can present their research ideas for the final MA thesis / media project and login directly during their fieldwork to discuss the reserach process. Additionally Prof. Frömming will give lectures about professional perspectives in Visual and Media Anthropology for those of the students who are planning a professional university career or a PhD-thesis. Classes take place via our Adobe Connect Webinar. Together we will discuss student's questions and professional options for the future.

Artistic Practice in Transcultural Contexts (Lidia Rossner) 

Online Course 

The course explores the converging zone between art and anthropology through analysis of research-based contemporary art practices situated in trans-cultural contexts. After an introduction to terminology, historical perspectives and an overview of the current discourse, from the perspectives of both art theory and anthropology, we will examine case studies of contemporary art practices. Core study materials comprise texts, audio-visual documentation of artwork, as well as artists’ interviews. Key themes addressed in the course include visual literacy; language as visual art; the ‘object’ as representative and a fetish; dreams/utopia; social and political activism. By critically assessing how artists respond to, adapt and negotiate trans-culturality, the aim of the course is to open up possibilities for analytical exploration of the arts as a social and professional resource. What can anthropology borrow and learn from the arts? Could this convergence zone be a site of fraternity, where collaborations and information exchanges take place, or is it a contested territory, where mutual envy (as per Hal Foster (1995)), is prevalent? Specifically, we’ll look into intersections, correspondences and conflicts between art practices and visual and media anthropology.

Still Frame: 8th Berlin Biennale at the Ethnologisches Museum by Jóhanna Björk Sveinbjörnsdóttir

Applied Visual Anthropology (developed and taught by Prof. Dr. Sarah Pink)

Online-course

Visual Anthropology methods and media are being increasingly used both in applied research across academic disciplines. The course explores historical and contemporary developments in the field of practice that we might call Applied Visual Anthropology. The basic principles of this approach might be conceptualized as involving participatory, collaborative and interdisciplinary research, with the aim of producing or contributing to some kind of social intervention. Yet within this definition there are variations. Each week we will examine a set of materials relating to specific areas and practices in applied visual anthropology.